Yves Saint Laurent and Christian Dior Vintage Jewellery

Some of the famous  jewellery designers such as Yves Saint Laurent , Christian Dior,and Christian Lacroix have produced some beautiful costume jewellery over the years. Some of the most beautiful pieces can be seen in some of the history of costume jewellery books such as  Millers Costume Jewellery book.

Examples of beautiful designer vintage jewellery such as beautiful  Yves Saint Laurent necklaces dating  from the 1980’s can be found at http://www.modernvintagestyle.co.uk/vintage-yves-saint-laurent-cabochon-necklace.  Christian Dior have also produced some fabulous jewellery incuding stunning necklaces such as these…http://www.modernvintagestyle.co.uk/vintage-antique-costume-jewellery/christian-dior-jewellery-uk

Although most of the jewellery that was produced did not involve precious gemstones , the workmanship was excellent resulting in some really stunning necklaces, bracelets, earrings and rings. The market for designer vintage costume jewellery is good just now , with designer vintage pieces  from the 1950’s to 1980’s by big brand names being much sought after.

 

 

 

Gemstone Jewellery at the V and A Museum

If you are looking for ideas for your jewellery designs a great place to visit is the V and A museum. They have some amazing jewellery on display covering all eras from Edwardian and Victiorian through to more modern pieces. The gemstone jewellery collections on display are really fantastic.

One of the exhibitions currently on from 21 November 2015 to 28 March 2016 is titled  “Bejewelled Treasure –  The Al Thani Collection. “

This exhibition is full of amazing objects, taken  from a single private collection, and it explores the  themes of tradition and modernity in fine Indian jewellery

Particular highlights  include Mughal jades, a rare and special jewelled gold finial from the throne of the  Tipu Sultan, and several items that reveal the dramatic changes that ocurred in  Indian jewellery design during the early part of  20th century. The exhibition  examines the influence that India had on avant-garde European jewellery made by the likes of  Cartier and other leading jewellery houses and finishes  with contemporary pieces made by Bhagat and Jar, which are much inspired by a creative combination  of Mughal motifs and Art Deco ‘Indian’ designs.

If you are a fan of amazing gemstone jewellery and history then its well worth a visit.  For further information on vintage costume  jewellery visit  www.http://www.modernvintagestyle.co.uk/vintage-antique-costume-jewellery,or for some beautiful vintage style gemstone  jewellery visit  –  modern vintage style jewellery 

 

How to Sell Your Handmade Jewellery – Part 1

How to Sell Your Handmade Jewellery. Part 1

The Foundations

Selling your handmade jewellery is almost an art-form of its own. We have all come across “great” salesmen in our time, so why do so many of us lack confidence when it comes to selling our work?
Handmade Jewellery - Designer Bracelet

Handmade vintage necklace – photos courtesy of Modern Vintage Style

How do we improve our marketing skills, maximise opportunities and find a way to turn from beginner jewellery designer into professional?

Even the best handcrafted jewellery does not sell itself.
The act of selling the jewellery is something that must be practised and learned.

In this 2 part article we will look at some of the best ways jewellery designers can sell their work.
Specifically looking at ways you can you sell your own work directly AND also get other galleries, boutiques, shops etc to also sell it for you.

Be honest with yourself – are you ready?

Its a basic and controversial question but one we must ask ourselves before starting selling to the public.

Are you ready to sell yet?

In fact, the one question most asked by jewellery designers when starting out is – “how will I know when I am ready to sell my own jewellery?”

If you are making well-made original jewellery designs, and if you know about your legal requirements and you believe there is a good market for your work – then yes, you are ready to sell.

If you are a beginner at jewellery-making though it might be worthwhile taking some time to think this over.
as there is an old saying “you wil never get a second chance to make a first impression.”

Fools Rush In……?

If you really want to make an ongoing sustainable business from your work, it pays to
start with good foundations.

Selling your work too early can create a nasty trap. The jewellery maker rushes into selling their work,
pricing their work deliberately very low just to get a foot into the market.
But they then risk getting stuck as the jewellery maker builds up a clientele who only wants simple  jewellery at very low prices.

So when the maker’s skills and experience eventually do eventually grow, she finds it verydifficult to get out of this trap, for fear of pricing herself too high and
out of the market she has creatd for herself.
There is absolutely nothing wrong in catering to any end of the market you choose.
It can be just as satisfiying selling summer styles to school kids as
it can be selling very elaborate work in expensive boutiques.
In both cases it is still very satisfying to know that someone else admired your design and chose to buy it.

But really should it not be be your choice what end of the market you choose to explore?
Rather than be forced to sell to one particular end of the market because those are the only sales you can make?

Being absolutely ready to sell gives you the ability to explore any market you choose. It means you can hold your own against any other designer out there chasing those very same sales.

So how do you know if you are ready to sell your jewellery?

This comes downto covering four bases: These are Workmanship, Originality, Desirability, and Legality
These four bases are covered in Part 2 of this article.

For  information and resources on  handmade jewellery see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_jewelry